You May Need to Stop Thinking Big

Why think big when so many breakthroughs are happening at the nano level?  And what can you learn from nanotechnology to improve time management?

Let’s start with computer memory.  As you have noticed, electronic devices keep getting smaller while computing power continues to grow.  But this pace can’t continue.  Eventually your small electronic devices will not be able to cram more documents or pictures or video into their memory.

Fortunately, Andreas Heinrich at the IBM research lab in California has a solution.  He and his team recently announced they had created the world’s smallest magnetic memory, which stores one bit of data on just twelve iron atoms.  Contrast that with the one million atoms it takes for current hard drives to store one bit of data.

Heinrich and his team found an innovative way to align the atoms, packing them more than one hundred times as densely as existing microchips.  This means you can expect impressive breakthroughs in the coming years with computer memory.

Now let’s consider the demands you have on your time.  Just as you keep saving more items into your computer’s memory, others keep asking more of you during the day.  But you only have so many hours.  And that’s why you need to follow Andreas Heinrich’s example and stop thinking big.

Just as the IBM team found a novel way to realign atoms, you can reconfigure your approach to time management by focusing on small units of time.  If you tracked what you accomplished every five to ten minutes of the day, what would you discover?  If you are like most people, you would find a lot of under-performing blocks of time.

Therefore, improving time management means winning at the small level.  By improving what occurs during each small block of time, you will be amazed at what you can accomplish while feeling a lot less overwhelmed.

Learn more about how our dental consulting can improve the time management of your entire team.

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